20 January 2017

Review: The Silk Weaver by Liz Trenow

Anna Buttterfield moves from her Suffolk country home to her uncle's house in London, to be introduced to society. A chance encounter with a local silk weaver, French immigrant Henri, throws her from her privileged upbringing to the darker, dangerous world of London's silk trade.

Henri is working on his 'master piece' to make his name as a master silk weaver; Anna, meanwhile, is struggling against the constraints of her family and longing to become an artist.

Henri realizes that Anna's designs could lift his work above the ordinary, and give them both an opportunity for freedom...


Source: NetGalley Request

5 Words: Family, silk, business, class, love.

This book is well written, with a split narrative of two very distinct and different voices. I did find that it took me longer than usual to read this book, but that was because I spent a lot of time sitting and reflecting as I got to the end of each of chapter. The story itself is well paced, a slow build up to a fantastically fast-paced ending.

I loved Anna's character, how she kept her free will and what made up the essence of herself despite the changes in her world and circumstance. I liked how there were tiny, natural changes in her thoughts and actions, and I loved her bravery. I did want to grab her by the shoulders and give her a good shake a few times.

This book is another triumph for the author, filled with delicious descriptions of the most sumptuous silks. It is incredibly well-researched and detailed, the whole time period comes alive on the page.

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