31 March 2017

Blog Tour: Review & Guestpost: Naondel by Maria Turtschaninoff

In the opulent palace of Ohaddin, women have one purpose - to obey.

Some were brought here as girls, captured and enslaved; some as servant; some as wives. All of them must do what the Master tells them, for he wields a deadly and secret power.

But the women have powers too. One is a healer. One can control dreams. One is a warrior. One can see everything that is coming.

In their golden prison, the women wait. They plan. They write down their stories. They dream of a refuge, a safe place where girls can be free.

And, finally, when the moon glows red, they will have their revenge.


Source: Review Consideration | Blog Tour

5 Words: Power, control, feminism, survival, magic.

I knew from the moment I read about the Naondel in Maresi that I had to know more.

This book is written in a slightly different style from Maresi, with the narrative changing at intervals between different characters. It still has the same feel to the writing, it's still quite blunt and in your face at times, but I loved it. I could easily distinguish between the characters - and quickly realised that I had a favourite. I just love Garai, okay?

I would definitely say to read this after Maresi, even though it is set before. It just felt more natural to read them in that order.
How did I start writing books? 
I think it began as soon as I learned to write. My Mum has saved some stories I wrote when I was five years old. They are completely misspelled and very hard to decipher, but if you do, you find classic fairytales with a beginning, middle and an end. Only there’s often a small twist. After the poor farmer boy who set out into the world to find his luck and fortune has rescued the princess the two look at each other and decide they have no intention of getting married. Instead they go their separate ways. 
I dreamed of becoming a writer for as long as I can remember. Only it was my secret dream: if adults asked, as adults do, what I wanted to be when I grew up I replied “deep sea diver or ballerina”, because I frankly thought my innermost dream was nobody’s business. Least of all some nosy adults’. And I loved writing: it was fun, and easy, and I was teeming with ideas. Until something happened in my teens. I suspect it was self-criticism paired with the teaching method at the time: for creative writing you got a topic, wrote your piece, turned it in and got graded. There was no editing, so what I took from it was that a text is either good or bad, and if it’s bad, there’s no way to fix it. Another reason was that I wanted to be a Real Writer so badly that I started writing what I thought Real Writers wrote: realism. The imagination, the fantastical, was childish. It took me many years of heartache and hard work to get back to the joy of storytelling, and it didn’t happen until I allowed myself to start writing fantasy again. 
I struggled for the longest time with what I considered a lack of ideas. But I was blocking all the creativity by thinking that as soon as I sat down to write, it had to become that most mythical and holy thing, A Book. And nothing I came up with was good enough fodder for that hallowed beast. 
It took me leaving the computer, and all that press and expectation, and just writing small exercises by hand in a notebook, to find my way back to fantasy, and ideas, and writing being fun, again.

3 comments:

  1. That cover is so gorgeous! Also, your blog is bad for my paychecks...

    x Envy

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  2. Oh I love your book reviews. I think I may treat myself to this one for the Easter holidays �� #TeacupClub

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  3. This looks.really interesting. I love artistic book covers they really draw you in x
    Lola Mia // www.lolitabonita.co.uk

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