05 April 2017

CORA AND THE REREADS: Flawed by Cecelia Ahern

CORA AND THE REREADS is where I reread and review a book.

Sometimes a book is so awesome you have to pick it up again. Sometimes you feel like a different person than you were when you first read it. Sometimes you just need to read that book again.

Celestine North lives a perfect life. She’s a model daughter and sister, she’s well-liked by her classmates and teachers, and she’s dating the impossibly charming Art Crevan.

But then Celestine encounters a situation in which she makes an instinctive decision. She breaks a rule and now faces life-changing repercussions. She could be imprisoned. She could be branded. She could be found FLAWED.

In this stunning novel, bestselling author Cecelia Ahern depicts a society in which perfection is paramount and mistakes are punished. And where one young woman decides to take a stand that could cost her everything.


Source: Review Consideration | Purchase

5 Words: Crime, punishment, family, revenge, justice.

5 More Words: Power, hate, love, hope, prejudice.

I've said it before and I'll say it again: This book is like Marmite. You'll either love it or you hate it.

I hate Marmite.

I love this book.

This is actually the third time I have read this book. The first time I finished it I flipped right back to the start and read it again. This time I'm refreshing my memory before Perfect comes out and seeing if it's everything I remember. Reader? It is everything and more.

One of the things that struck me most about Flawed when I first read it was that it was written with passion and real conviction behind the message. On rereading this was even more evident. Flawed does not pull any punches, it is vicious and shocking, so much so that even on rereading I had to put it down and step away, shaking, to calm myself.

There is one scene about 1/3 through this book that makes me feel physically sick, like I can't catch my breath, that makes me tremble in fear and anger and repulsion. It is brutal. But it is integral to the plot, the turning point that changes everything. And I could not stop reading.

I love how reading this again meant that I saw it in a slightly different light. By the end of the book the words Flawed and Perfect had completely deconstructed and redefined. Right from the off, the word Flawed is used a lot. In fact, it's used over 300 times. This repetition first enforces the original meaning, then makes it meaningless, then turns it on its head. It is powerfully written.

If you have not read this book, what are you waiting for? It was so good that I had to put it down.

I love stuff like this, so I took the test:
The Guild has judged you FLAWED with a morality score of 50%

5 comments:

  1. I bought this book but still haven't read it. My sister read it first though, and she really liked it. I have a queue of books in my TBR list, but your review is tempting me to read it now!

    My latest book review :)

    x Ain

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  2. Ooh I love your 'rereads' series, that's such a good idea! I've never thought about reviewing my re-reads. I'm currently reading The Marble Collector by Cecelia Ahern and I'm a huge fan of her books. I've read loads - except this one! But this honestly sounds fantastic and definitely my kinda book. I love a book with a strong message that's drilled into you and makes you think! xx

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  3. I know this author. I read PS I love you few years ago. In Italian though. And I loved it! I should give this one a go too! xx Corinne

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  4. This sounds gripping! I like a bit of darkness to a book to make your hairs stand on edge. x

    Sophia \\ http://sophiawhitham.co.uk

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  5. The way you've described it is so INTRIGUING! Definitely going on my list!

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